Understanding The Knowledge Management Model

Posted by Trevor Tshabangu
Tuesday, 11 July 2017  |  Comments
Trevor is a director at Transcend Corporate Advisors.
Read all of Trevor Tshabangu's Posts

These concerns over the years have become even more acute as firms grapple with growing frequent downsizing, retirement trends, mergers and acquisitions. The questions to ask are: How can organizations abridge the way in which employees share and record knowledge? And how can they transfigure the knowledge in people’s heads into processes and tools that the entire work force can use?

"Sometimes what happens is that employees find new, innovative and more efficient methods of executing a process but this is not reflected in the original process document and therefore lost in the wind."

Usually, the time to refer to the original document or policy is neglected and or nobody remembers to make the necessary changes to reflect today’s practical steps. Sometimes what happens is that employees find new, innovative and more efficient methods of executing a process but this is not reflected in the original process document and therefore lost in the wind. There is, therefore, a complete disconnect between what the process should be and what is in the original process document.

Furthermore, when employees with many years of experience or those who hold strategic positions regardless of their occupational level leave the business, a “handover” process is conducted and this is followed by an exit interview. These two processes are not good enough and do not address the challenges of knowledge loss in the business.

"a “handover” process...and an exit interview. These two processes are not good enough and do not address the challenges of knowledge loss in the business"

In addressing these and other issues, especially BEE related processes, Transcend Corporate Advisors will assist clients in preserving valuable information, unrecorded processes, procedures and unrecorded intellectual detail that may be sitting in employees’ minds.

The process would require a thorough scan of the selected transformation processes and procedures with high risk to determine whether they are in line with the day to day on the job practice. 3 key questions are asked of each department and these are:

  • What BEE knowledge is at risk?
  • What effect will it have on the business if unattended to?
  • What actions can be put in place to retain it?

The process requires the client, assisted by Transcend to identify key processes with the largest level of risk. Some of the key risk areas in BEE are Skills Development and Enterprise & Supplier Development which are also priority elements and require a “third eye” with regards to step by step procedures. Transcend would then engage the respective departmental heads to kick off the process of aligning the business processes to the practical day-to-day activities. This, in turn, assists the business in future BEE audit and other processes.

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